Last updated: March 24, 2020 2:00 p.m.

Our team has created this information to help if you or someone in your family is not feeling well and are exhibiting symptoms such as fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Please check this page often as we continue to update.

Do I (or someone in my family) have COVID-19 (coronavirus)?

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough and shortness of breath. 

When should I contact my doctor?

If you develop symptoms such as fever, cough, and/or difficulty breathing, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 or have recently traveled from an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19, stay home and call us at 210-938-9355.

Over 60 years of age, pregnant, or immunocompromised

Contact us at 210-938-9355 early, even if your symptoms are mild. We will monitor your health more closely and test you for COVID-19 or influenza.

Severe symptoms

If you have severe symptoms, such as persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, or bluish lips or face, go to the emergency room and seek care immediately. 

Mild symptoms

If you do not have a high-risk condition and your symptoms are mild, you do not need to be evaluated in person and do not need to be tested for COVID-19. It is important to understand there is no current treatment for COVID-19. In most cases, the recommendation will be to stay at home and self-quarantine.

What should I do to keep my infection from spreading to my family and other people in the community?

Stay at home except to get medical care
  • Restrict activities outside your home except getting medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Avoid public transportation, ride-sharing, etc.
  • Separate yourself from others in your home.
  • As much as possible, stay in a specific room away from other people in your home. Also, use a separate bathroom, if available.
Call ahead before visiting your doctor
  • If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19, inform the medical staff so they can take steps to keep other from getting infected or exposed.
Wear a face mask
  • Wear a face mask when you are around other people before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are unable to wear a face masks (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not be in the same room with you, or they should wear a face mask around you. 
Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60-95% alcohol covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
Clean your hands often
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day
  • High- touch services include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, bedside tables, cell phones. Use household cleaning spray or wipes according to label instructions. 
Monitor your symptoms
  • Seek prompt medical attention if your symptoms are worsening (ex: difficulty breathing). 
  • Before getting medical care, make sure to call your doctor’s office. Make sure to wear a face mask before visiting. 
  • If an emergency, call 9-1-1.
Partners with COVID-19 who have stayed home (home isolated) can stop home isolation under the following conditions:
  • If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these 3 things have happened:
    1. You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers) AND
    2. other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved) AND
    3. at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared
  • If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
    1. You no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers) AND
    2. other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved) AND
    3. you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. 

Where can I seek testing in my area?

Texas is currently in the process of ramping up testing services for individuals with suspected COVID-19. While tests become more readily available, we recommend reaching out to us at 210-938-9355 if you meet criteria as listed above.

How can I prepare and plan for the spread of COVID-19 (coronavirus)?

Our team has prepared a suggested shopping list and preventive actions to take. Download the guide here.

COVID_Resource

What do I do if I'm feeling anxious?

It is not uncommon to be experiencing a higher level of stress and anxiety during this time. If you would like to speak to a mental health professional, H-E-B offers free telehealth counseling services for all Partners and their dependents. You may request an appointment through Magenta or contact ComPsych directly 24 hours a day/7 days a week at (888) 327-4432 . We’re in this together.

Where can I find additional resources around COVID-19 (coronavirus)?